OCULUS VR SICKENS MANY, BORES OTHERS

OCULUS VR SICKENS MANY, BORES OTHERS

 

 

Why Virtual Reality Still Doesn’t Work, even after Facebook plowed billions into it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beware the perils of ‘Oculus face’: VR headset leaves embarrassing red marks and can cause wearers to feel ‘seasick’

 

  • Journslists testing the Oculus Rift have reported red marks on their faces 

  • Temporary marks have been dubbed ‘Oculus face’ and ‘Rift rash’

  • $599 (£417) gadget started shipping to buyers and requires high-end PC

  • Some users have also reported feeling nauseous and woozy  

 

By Sarah Griffiths for MailOnline

 

The first gamers to get their hands on the full Oculus Rift have noticed embarrassing side-effects to wearing Facebook’s virtual reality headset.

 

While the $599 (£417) gadget may immerse them in realistic fantasy scenes, it has left some users with red-faced – literally. 

 

The awkward marks have been dubbed ‘Oculus face’ or ‘Rift rash’ and are part of the perils of the innovative technology. 

 

Oculus face pic.twitter.com/yQK52d0cwN

 

— Steve Kovach (@stevekovach) March 28, 2016

 

The first gamers to get their hands on the full Oculus Rift headset have noticed embarrassing side-effects to wearing Facebook’s virtual reality headset. Here, journalist Steve Kovash shows off his ‘Oculus face’ 

 

Journalists Ben Popper of The Verge and Steve Kovash and Ben Gilbert, from Tech Insider shared photos of themselves with Oculus face on Twitter, with Mr Popper writing: ‘The new walk of shame: Oculus face after a VR bender’.   

 

The first batch of gamers are receiving the headsets, with more reports of ‘Oculus face’ expected, because the headset has just been shipped to buyers.

 

The marks are caused by the pressure of the headset’s straps and spongy rim on the face, leaving the wearer with temporary red marks.

 

They seem to oppose Oculus’ description on its website that says: ‘Customisable, comfortable, adaptable, and beautiful, Rift is technology and design as remarkable as the experiences it enables.’ 

 

The new walk of shame: Oculus face after a VR bender pic.twitter.com/N4OyOGGh6X

 

— Ben Popper (@benpopper) March 28, 2016

 

The first batch of gamers have received the headsets, with more reports of ‘Oculus face’ expected, because the headset has just been shipped to buyers. Here, Ben Popper models ‘Rift rash’ in a tweet

 

THE RISE OF OCULUS RIFT 

 

Oculus said it’s sending the Rift to its first Kickstarter backers first, followed by those who ordered one in January for $600 (£420) or at least $1,500 (£1,050) with a high-end personal computer included. 

 

Oculus, which began crowd-funding through Kickstarter in August 2012, was acquired by Facebook for $2 billion in 2014 and has shipped two developer versions so far. 

 

The black headgear comes with a remote, an audio system, a sensor and an Xbox One wireless controller.

 

Oculus said there were more than 30 games available on the Oculus Store and it would soon add feature-length movies. 

 

There’s a backlog of orders and people who order now shouldn’t expect delivery until July.

 

It’s not clear, though, how many units Oculus made for the first round, and whether there will ultimately be much demand beyond gamers and hard-core technologists.

 

But it’s not known whether other people will experience the cosmetic problem, or whether other headsets such as HTC’s Vive or Sony’s Playstation VR will also leave users with temporary marks.

 

The bigger concern, instead, is the fact they are also causing some people to feel sick.

 

Speaking at this week’s Games Developers Conference in San Francisco, Evan Suma, an assistant professor who studies VR at the University of Southern California said: ‘The challenge is that people’s sensitivity to motion and simulator sickness varies wildly.’

 

This means it’s tricky for game makers to create titles that are thrilling and immersive, not just nauseous.

 

The low-latency headsets from Oculus, HTC and Sony are intended to right the nausea-inducing wrongs of their VR predecessors from 20 years ago, but many users still report feeling woozy after using souped-up systems, such as the Oculus Rift.

 

There’s still concern the immersive technology may force players to lose more than a battle with an alien. They could also lose their lunch.

 

Hilmar Petursson, CEO of CCP Games, which is developing several VR games, including the sci-fi dogfighting simulator ‘EVE: Valkyrie, said: ‘It’s been a huge focus of development. We want super comfort all the way.’

 

When you emerge from A VR coma to learn @dcseifert has been creepshotting you all day pic.twitter.com/dKEqXH9fnb

 

— Ben Popper (@benpopper) March 28, 2016

 

It’s not known whether other people will experience the cosmetic problem, or whether other headsets such as HTC’s Vive or Sony’s Playstation VR will also leave users with temporary marks (example shown above)

 

Petursson said the developers of Valkyrie opted to surround seated players with a virtual cockpit to ground and shelter them from the effects of appearing to whiz through space past asteroids, missiles and ships.

 

Other designers are attempting to tackle the problem by limiting movement in virtual worlds and not inundating players with head-spinning stimuli.

 

‘If you have something for your brain to fixate on as the thing that matches similar inputs you’re given when sitting in the real world, you’re going to be feeling a lot better,’ said Palmer Luckey, co-founder of Oculus, which ignited the latest VR revolution in 2012. 

 

 

 

+3

 

The low-latency headsets from Oculus, HTC and Sony are intended to right the nausea-inducing wrongs of their VR predecessors from 20 years ago, but many users still report feeling woozy after using souped-up systems, such as the Oculus Rift (pictured) 

 

PLAYSTATION VR TO UNDERCAUT OCULUS RIFT

 

Sony’s version of virtual reality will cost a few hundred dollars less than competitors when its headset is released in October.

 

The company announced a $399 (£349/AUD $549.95) price tag and the October release date for PlayStation VR during the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco.

 

The head-mounted display works in tandem with the PlayStation 4 console.

 

The headset surrounds a wearer’s vision and immerses them in 360-degree virtual worlds.

 

The Rift will be available March 28 for $599, while the Vive will be released April 5 for $799.

 

They both require high-end PCs in order to work.

 

Sony said it expects over 50 games will be available for PlayStation VR at launch. 

 

Oculus and Sony both posted health and safety warnings outside their booths on the GDC show floor, cautioning attendees trying the Rift and PlayStation VR that they may feel motion sickness, nausea, disorientation and blurred vision. 

 

Those effects were felt by many attendees.

 

‘After a morning’s worth of different Rift games, I felt disorientated, a touch nauseous and distinctly headachey,’ wrote Keza MacDonald on the gaming site Kotaku.

 

‘After five hours, I felt like I needed a lie-down in a dark room.’

 

Kimberly Voll, senior technical designer at Radial Games, noted during her GDC speech about the effects of VR on the brain that more academic research about VR should be conducted.

 

‘We really need to look hard at the effects of long-term exposure to VR, the psychological effects and what we can say about the power of our VR experiences,’ she said.

 

With hype for VR at an all-time high and pre-orders for the Rift and HTC Vive sold out, it’s no longer a question of if consumers will want to experience VR, but how they will cope with it.

 

For example, will two hours of solid game playing be too nauseous to handle?

 

 

 

+3

 

‘After a morning’s worth of different Rift games, I felt disorientated, a touch nauseous and distinctly headachey,’ wrote Keza MacDonald on the gaming site Kotaku. The consumer version of the headset is shown 

 

Mr Luckey said: ‘With the current technology, it’s iffy, but it’s all technologically solvable.

 

‘It’s not like we’re saying, ‘Oh no. We can’t get any better. This is a dead end.’ We have tons of ways to make this higher resolution, lighter weight and more comfortable.

 

‘Eventually, the goal is to make something that’s not much heavier than a pair of sunglasses.’

 

For many who’ve tried VR, it’s not an issue at all. Hidden Path Entertainment founder Jeff Pobst said he recently spent 15 hours wearing the Rift headset while playing the VR version of his strategy game, Defense Grid 2.

 

‘I was happy. I even did it with glasses on and didn’t take the headset off to put in my contacts,’ he said.

 

‘It all depends on the person and the experience. When there’s not a lot of movement and the controls aren’t tiring, I think you can be in VR indefinitely.’  

 

THE VIRTUAL REALITY WARS 

 

Manufacturer 

Launch Date 

 Cost

 

Needed to run 

Facebook’s Oculus Rift

March 28th 

$599 (£499/AUD $1100)

 

High end PC costing around $1,000 

HTC Vive 

April 5 

$799 (£689/AUD $1200+)

 

High end PC costing around $1,000 

Sony Playstation VR 

October 

$399 (£349/AUD $549.95)

 

PlayStation 4 console 

 

 

 

+3

 

Oculus and Sony both posted health and safety warnings outside their booths on the GDC show floor, cautioning attendees trying the Rift and PlayStation VR that they may feel motion sickness, nausea, disorientation and blurred vision. Sony’s headset is shown above 

 

 

 


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THE NIGHTMARE OF CORPORATE VR

 

By Cinthia Reston- University of Washington

 

Some guy at Oculus VR discovered that a guy named Eric Howlett had invented some plastic lenses called LEEP lenses long before the Oculus guy was born. So the Oculus guy figures: “Oh, Well, old Howlett is dead, I might as well just use his lenses”. Oculus invented nothing. They copied old things and convinced the dumb technology venture capitalists that it was something new.

 

 

The amazing thing about the lenses is that they cover your whole eyeball and make it look more like a wrap around screen. The LEEP optics were custom created for NASA and CIA mission simulators.

 

 

The 2016 versions of VR are still using Howlett’s lenses from decades ago; except they don’t need to pay him because he is dead.

 

 

The reality of Virtual Reality is that no normal computer can power it. You need to spend at least $5000.00 to $10,000.00 in computer hardware to even get a dim hope of having enough power to have a convincing experience.

 

 

The other reality of Virtual Reality is that it can cause brain damage, optic damage and nausea.

 

 

VR is really fun for the first 5 minutes at a CES demo, after that, you begin to wonder what the point is because, when you take off the cumbersome sweaty goggles, you can see real reality, in higher resolution, with actual 3D sound, FOR FREE.

 

 

Petting virtual cats and swimming with virtual whales is fun for four of those 5 minutes, after that: Boring!

 

 

The decades old Howlett LEEP lenses are cool but nothing has really caught up to the potential.

 

 

Mark Zuckerberg got sold on scanning peoples brainwaves, eye movements and intentions while narcotized and hypnotized in a VR headset experience. As much as Facebook loves raping your dating history on a Facebook page, they can go wild on your breathing rate, gaze patterns, voice inflection commands and other body data when you look at 3D videos of Hillary, Huma, Donald or Bernie.

 

 

You are so susceptible to suggestions, in your little VR cocoon, that you can be manipulated into doing all kinds of things… or voting for all kinds of people.

 

 

The super-rich yuppie tech elite brogrammers of Silicon Valley have hacked together their own state-of-the-art systems with their six figure salaries and their carte blanche credit cards at Fry’s Electronics. Now they have discovered the reality. VR does not work as anything more than a few minutes of time-killing distraction. The heat, sweat, nausea, cord restrictions, goggle weight, slow image response, outside distractions, and other downsides are not worth the expense. You know what “hat-head” is, right? That mashed-down hair effect?

 

 

With VR goggle’s you get both hat head and googly goggle eyes. After a long bout with VR you have weird mashed down hair, all the way around, just above your ears; plus an intense figure 8-shaped red lined crease all the way around your eyes like a space raccoon. That is where the VR goggles dig into your face. If you are at work and you try a little VR at lunch-time, everybody in the office knows what you did because of the strange markings on your face and your blood-shot eyes.

 

 

Life also virtually kills reality. Gamers still need to pee and eat. As soon as nature calls them to fill their stomachs with Spaghettios or empty their bladders, the experience dies as you rip the goggles off. Returning to the goggles, from the real world, then seems like a dark and gloomy option.

 

 

Oculus VR is a ViewMaster for rich yuppies that will consume a few minutes of their day until soon tire of it and leave it in the corner next to their IPOD, their DVD player and their massage chair.